Category: Did you know….


Focus on the Kidneys During National Kidney Month in March


March is National Kidney Month and the NKF is urging all Americans to give their kidneys a second thought and a well-deserved checkup.

Kidneys filter 200 liters of blood a day, help regulate blood pressure and direct red blood cell production. But they are also prone to disease; 1 in 3 Americans is at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. There are more than 26 million Americans who already have kidney disease, and most don’t know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed.

During National Kidney Month in March, and in honor of World Kidney Day on March 14, the NKF offers the following health activities to promote awareness of kidneys, risk factors and kidney disease:

  • Free Screenings: On World Kidney Day and throughout the Month of March, NKF is offering free screenings to those most at risk for kidney disease – anyone with diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. Locations and information can be found on the calendar on our website.
  • ‘Are You at Risk’ Kidney Quiz: Early detection can make a difference in preventing kidney disease so it’s important to know if you’re at risk. Take the online kidney quiz!
  • Live Twitter Chat with Dr. Joseph Vassalotti: The National Kidney Foundation’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, will be hosting an interactive kidney Q&A on World Kidney Day, Thursday, March 14, from 12-2 pm ET. Ask your questions at www.twitter.com/nkf using the hash-tag #WorldKidneyDayNKF

About The Kidneys:

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health through the following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day.
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content.
  • Removing of drugs from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids.
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure.
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones.
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells.

Quick Facts on Kidney Disease:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • More than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the US today.

For more information please visit www.kidney.org or contact Love My Nurse Home Health Care office and a staff member will assist you!!


American Heart Month


Who isn’t trying to eat healthy these days? After all, it can help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke and lots of other things you’d rather avoid. The good news is, eating right doesn’t have to be hard or require you to give up things you love. It’s all about making smart choices to build an overall healthy dietary pattern.


Glaucoma Facts and Stats…more than just protecting your eyes


Glaucoma is a very misunderstood disease. Often, people don’t realize the severity or who is affected.

Four Key Facts About Glaucoma

1. Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness

Glaucoma can cause blindness if it is left untreated. And unfortunately approximately 10% of people with glaucoma who receive proper treatment still experience loss of vision.

2. There is no cure (yet) for glaucoma

Glaucoma is not curable, and vision lost cannot be regained. With medication and/or surgery, it is possible to halt further loss of vision. Since open-angle glaucoma is a chronic condition, it must be monitored for life. Diagnosis is the first step to preserving your vision.

3. Everyone is at risk for glaucoma

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma from babies to senior citizens. Older people are at a higher risk for glaucoma but babies can be born with glaucoma (approximately 1 out of every 10,000 babies born in the United States). Young adults can get glaucoma, too. African Americans in particular are susceptible at a younger age.

4. There may be no symptoms to warn you

With open-angle glaucoma, the most common form, there are virtually no symptoms. Usually, no pain is associated with increased eye pressure. Vision loss begins with peripheral or side vision. You may compensate for this unconsciously by turning your head to the side, and may not notice anything until significant vision is lost. The best way to protect your sight from glaucoma is to get tested. If you have glaucoma, treatment can begin immediately.

Some Statistics About Glaucoma

It is estimated that over 3 million Americans have glaucoma but only half of those know they have it.

  • In the U.S., more than 120,000 are blind from glaucoma, accounting for 9% to 12% of all cases of blindness.
  • Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, according to the World Health Organization.
  • After cataracts, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness among African Americans.
  • Blindness from glaucoma is 6 to 8 times more common in African Americans than Caucasians.
  • African Americans are 15 times more likely to be visually impaired from glaucoma than Caucasians.
  • The most common form, open-angle glaucoma, accounts for 19% of all blindness among African Americans compared to 6% in Caucasians.
  • Other high-risk groups include: people over 60, family members of those already diagnosed, diabetics, and people who are severely nearsighted.
  • Estimates put the total number of suspected cases of glaucoma at over 60 million worldwide.

For more information please visit http://www.glaucoma.org or contact Love My Nurse Home Health care and a staff member would be happy to assist you!!


October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States (other than skin cancer). But millions of women are surviving the disease thanks in part to early detection and improvements in treatment.

The American Cancer Society is actively fighting breast cancer by helping women get tested to find breast cancer earlier, and helping them understand their treatment options and cope with the physical and emotional side effects. We also fund research to help prevent, find, and treat breast cancer.

Whether you’re trying to reduce your risk of breast cancer, increase the chance of finding it early, or coping with a diagnosis, the American Cancer Society has comprehensive information to help you understand your options.

The American Cancer Society has played a role in nearly every breast cancer breakthrough in recent history. Our staff of full-time researchers produce detailed analyses of breast cancer trends and investigate the links between lifestyle and breast cancer. We also fund external researchers dedicated to finding better ways to prevent, detect, and treat the disease, and improve the quality of life of breast cancer patients and survivors.

For more information please visit http://www.cancer.org/healthy/morewaysacshelpsyoustaywell/breastcancer or contact Love My Nurse Home Health and we will be happy to assist you however we can!!


July is Eye Injury Prevention Month


Protecting your eyes from injury is one of the most basic things you can do to keep your vision healthy throughout your life. You may be somewhat aware of the possible risks of eye injuries, but are you taking the easiest step of all to prevent 90 percent of those injuries: wearing the proper protective eyewear?

If you are not taking this step, you are not alone. According to a national survey by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, only 35 percent of respondents said they always wear protective eyewear when performing home repairs or maintenance; even fewer do so while playing sports.

If you have suffered an eye injury, review these care and treatment recommendations. But most importantly, have an ophthalmologist or other medical doctor examine the eye as soon as possible, even if the injury seems minor.

Eye Injury Facts and Myths

Men are more likely to sustain an eye injury than women.

Most people believe that eye injuries are most common on the job — especially in the course of work at factories and construction sites. But, in fact, nearly half (44.7 percent) of all eye injuries occurred in the home, as reported during the fifth-annual Eye Injury Snapshot (conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Ocular Trauma).

More than 40 percent of eye injuries reported in the Eye Injury Snapshot were caused by projects and activities such as home repairs, yard work, cleaning and cooking. More than a third (34.2 percent) of injuries in the home occurred in living areas such as the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living or family room.

More than 40 percent of eye injuries every year are related to sports or recreational activities.

Eyes can be damaged by sun exposure, not just chemicals, dust or objects.

Among all eye injuries reported in the Eye Injury Snapshot, more than 78 percent of people were not wearing eyewear at the time of injury. Of those reported to be wearing eyewear of some sort at the time of injury (including glasses or contact lenses), only 5.3 percent were wearing safety or sports glasses.

For more information please visit www.aao.org or contact Love My Nurse Home Health for additional resources.


June is Men’s Health Month


In recognition of Men’s Health Month currently going on Love My Nurse Home Health would like to provide information about a topic very specific to men; the Prostate. You should know what your prostate is and what it does. Over 30 million men suffer from prostate conditions that impact their quality of life. Each year over 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and about 30,000 will die from it. The prostate is a part of your sex organs that produce fluid and contributes to the production of sperm. It’s small, about the size of a walnut, and surrounds the urethra, a tube that takes urine from the bladder to the penis. The urethra also carries semen during ejaculation. The prostate gland grows during puberty and then doesn’t change much until about age 40. Then it begins growing again and may continue to grow with age. Some men aren’t bothered by the growth, but others will develop one of three prostate diseases and sometimes, more than one. For more information please visit www.menshealthresourcecenter.com or contact Love My Nurse Home Health for additional resources.


May is National Osteoporosis Month


Did you know that one in two women and up to one in four men over age 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis? It’s true, but eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly can help slow or stop the loss of bone mass and help prevent fractures.

Join Love My Nurse and the National Osteoporosis Foundation in celebrating National Osteoporosis Month this May by taking action to Break Free from Osteoporosis. The NOF’s Break Free from Osteoporosis campaign encourages everyone to get to know their risk factors for osteoporosis and make the lifestyle changes needed to build strong bones for life.

Please go tohttps://www.nof.org/about-us/building-awareness/national-osteoporosis-month/ to download and share the information and materials below to join us in spreading the word about the importance of building and maintaining strong bones.


4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your Memory


March is National Nutrition Month, when the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reminds everyone to return to the basics of healthy eating. It is also the time of year when the Academy celebrates expertise of registered dietitian nutritionists as the food and nutrition experts.

If you’re feeling forgetful, it could be due to a lack of sleep or a number of other reasons including genetics, level of physical activity, and lifestyle and environmental factors. However, there’s no doubt that diet plays a major role in brain health.

The best menu for boosting memory and brain function encourages good blood flow to the brain — much like what you’d eat to nourish and protect your heart. A recent study found that the Mediterranean Diet helps in keeping aging brains sharp, and a growing body of evidence links foods like those in the Mediterranean diet with better cognitive function, memory and alertness.  For more information contact Love My Nurse Home Health or visit http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/wellness/healthy-aging/memory-boosting-foods to learn more.


Strong Men Put Their Heart Health First


Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women.1 While Americans of all backgrounds can be at risk for heart disease, African American men, especially those who live in the southeast region of the United States, are at the highest risk for heart disease.2 Additionally, more than 40 percent of African Americans have high blood pressure, a leading cause of heart disease and stroke.3 That’s why this February during American Heart Month, Million Hearts® is encouraging African American men to take charge of their health and start one new, heart-healthy behavior that can help reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke. For additional information please visit the Center for Disease Control at http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/


A special thanks to our armed forces


Today marks the 14th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against our country by those who attempt to destroy our freedom.  Love My Nurse wanted to give those who are currently serving, have served, or lost their lives defending the very things we all have come to love and cherish a very special thanks. Freedom is not free; we are all indebted to the individuals who protect this country every single day. Please take today as an opportunity to thank members of our armed forces for everything they do for us as Americans. This truly is the greatest country in the world and we owe it all to those who believe in defending our freedom.