Monthly Archives: March 2020


What should I do if someone in my house has COVID-19?


Household members, intimate partners, and caregivers in a non-healthcare setting may have close contact with a person with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 or a person under investigation. Close contacts should monitor their health; they should call their healthcare provider right away if they develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, shortness of breath).

Close contacts should also follow these recommendations:

  • Make sure that you understand and can help the patient follow their healthcare provider’s instructions for medication(s) and care. You should help the patient with basic needs in the home and provide support for getting groceries, prescriptions, and other personal needs.
  • Monitor the patient’s symptoms. If the patient is getting sicker, call his or her healthcare provider and tell them that the patient has laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected. Ask the healthcare provider to call the local or state health department for additional guidance. If the patient has a medical emergency and you need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that the patient has, or is being evaluated for COVID-19.
  • Household members should stay in another room or be separated from the patient as much as possible. Household members should use a separate bedroom and bathroom, if available.
  • Prohibit visitors who do not have an essential need to be in the home.
  • Household members should care for any pets in the home. Do not handle pets or other animals while sick.  For more information, see COVID-19 and Animals.
  • Make sure that shared spaces in the home have good air flow, such as by an air conditioner or an opened window, weather permitting.
  • Perform hand hygiene frequently. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • The patient should wear a facemask when you are around other people. If the patient is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), you, as the caregiver, should wear a mask when you are in the same room as the patient.
  • Wear a disposable facemask and gloves when you touch or have contact with the patient’s blood, stool, or body fluids, such as saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomit, urine.
      • Throw out disposable facemasks and gloves after using them. Do not reuse.
      • When removing personal protective equipment, first remove and dispose of gloves. Then, immediately clean your hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Next, remove and dispose of facemask, and immediately clean your hands again with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing household items with the patient. You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, bedding, or other items. After the patient uses these items, you should wash them thoroughly (see below “Wash laundry thoroughly”).
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces, such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables, every day. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
      • Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
  • Wash laundry thoroughly.
      • Immediately remove and wash clothes or bedding that have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
      • Wear disposable gloves while handling soiled items and keep soiled items away from your body. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after removing your gloves.
      • Read and follow directions on labels of laundry or clothing items and detergent. In general, using a normal laundry detergent according to washing machine instructions and dry thoroughly using the warmest temperatures recommended on the clothing label.
  • Place all used disposable gloves, facemasks, and other contaminated items in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after handling these items. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Discuss any additional questions with your state or local health department or healthcare provider. Check available hours when contacting your local health department.

Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/


What should I do if I think I have COVID-19?


Your healthcare provider and public health staff will evaluate whether you can be cared for at home. If it is determined that you do not need to be hospitalized and can be isolated at home, you will be monitored by staff from your local or state health department. You should follow the prevention steps below until a healthcare provider or local or state health department says you can return to your normal activities.

Stay home except to get medical care

People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home

People: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.Animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

Wear a facemask

You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can. Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean your hands often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.Soap and water are the best option if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing personal household items

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.

Monitor your symptoms

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19. Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed. Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate. When working with your local health department check their available hours.If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that you have, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before emergency medical services arrive.

Discontinuing home isolation

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.

Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/


Do your best to ‘Survive’ COVID-19 by washing your hands for at least 20 seconds


Legendary singer Gloria Gaynor posted a Tik Tok video, March 12, 2019, promoting proper hand washing technique. By singing the chorus of her disco hit “I Will Survive,” while thoroughly washing your hands with soap and water, you will meet the CDC guidelines for good hand hygiene.

Oh no, not I, I will survive
Oh, as long as I know how to love, I know I’ll stay alive
I’ve got all my life to live
And I’ve got all my love to give and I’ll survive
I will survive, hey, hey.


A message from Love My Nurse regarding COVID-19


At Love My Nurse, our primary concern is always the health, safety and well-being of our clients, employees and all their family members.

Because of the 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) concerns, we want to let you know we are increasing our already high standards. Love My Nurse closely follows the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), local governments, and public health agencies. Our staff has been trained to uphold and practice the precautionary measures below:

  • Love My Nurse has made proper hand washing a priority.
  • All of our employees have recently been provided their annual training on Infection Control and Universal Precautions this year.
  • Sick team members are to stay home.

Love My Nurse is committed to keeping its clients and families safe in their own home, as well as its employees and their families.

If our organization receives updates that may impact our clients’ safety and well being or our ability to serve them safely, we’ll be sure to let you know.

Love My Nurse is prepared to move forward through these challenging times and circumstances with everyone’s safety in mind and will continue to provide helpful information on our website and through our social media accounts. 

Thank you.

The Love My Nurse Family


Keeping safe during the COVID-19 pandemic


IN YOUR HOME

All households

  • Clean hands at the door and at regular intervals;
  • Create habits and reminders to avoid touching their face and cover coughs and sneezes;
  • Disinfect surfaces like doorknobs, tables, and handrails regularly; and
  • Increase ventilation by opening windows or adjusting air conditioning.

Households with vulnerable seniors or those with significant underlying conditions

Significant underlying conditions include heart, lung, kidney disease; diabetes; and conditions that suppress the immune system:

  • Have the healthy people in the household conduct themselves as if they were a significant risk to the person with underlying conditions. For example, wash hands frequently before interacting with the
    person, such as by feeding or caring for the person;
  • If possible, provide a protected space for vulnerable household members; and
  • Ensure all utensils and surfaces are cleaned regularly.

Households with sick family members

  • Give sick members their own room if possible, and keep the door closed;
  • Have only one family member care for them; and
  • Consider providing additional protections or more intensive care for household members over 65 years old or with underlying conditions.

IN THE WORKPLACE

Practice good hygiene

  • Stop handshaking – use other non-contact methods of greeting;
  • Clean hands at the door and schedule regular hand washing reminders by email;
  • Create habits and reminders to avoid touching their faces and cover coughs and sneezes;
  • Disinfect surfaces like doorknobs, tables, desks, and handrails regularly; and
  • Increase ventilation by opening windows or adjusting air conditioning.

Be careful with meetings and travel

  • Use videoconferencing for meetings when possible;
  • When not possible, hold meetings in open, well-ventilated spaces;
  • Consider adjusting or postponing large meetings or gatherings; and
  • Assess the risks of business travel.

Handle food carefully

  • Limit food sharing;
  • Strengthen health screening for cafeteria staff and their close contacts; and
  • Ensure cafeteria staff and their close contacts practice strict hygiene.

Stay home if…

  • You are feeling sick; or
  • If you have a sick family member in your home.

AT SCHOOL

Practice good hygiene

  • Stop handshaking – use other non-contact methods of greeting;
  • Clean hands at the door and schedule regular hand washing reminders by email;
  • Create habits and reminders to avoid touching their faces and cover coughs and sneezes;
  • Disinfect surfaces like doorknobs, tables, desks, and handrails regularly; and
  • Increase ventilation by opening windows or adjusting air conditioning.

Consider rearranging large activities and gatherings

  • Consider adjusting or postponing gatherings that mix between classes and grades;
  • Adjust after-school arrangements to avoid mixing between classes and grades; and
  • When possible, hold classes outdoors or in open, well-ventilated spaces

Handle food carefully

  • Limit food sharing;
  • Strengthen health screening for cafeteria staff and their close contacts; and
  • Ensure cafeteria staff and their close contacts practice strict hygiene.

Stay home if…

  • You are feeling sick; or
  • If you have a sick family member in your home.

Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/workplace-school-and-home-guidance.pdf


Myths vs. Facts: 2019 Coronavirus


In an age where misinformation can spread as fast—or faster—than accurate information, please remember the best way to prevent transmission of the 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) is through proper hand washing and good sanitation practice.

We at Love My Nurse believe it’s time to debunk the myths and learn some of the facts about COVID-19.

  • MYTH
    The new coronavirus will go away when the weather gets warmer (or gets cooler).

FACT
From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather and areas with cold weather. There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases. The normal human body temperature remains around 97.7°F to 98.6°F, regardless of the external temperature or weather.

  • MYTH
    Taking a hot bath prevents the new coronavirus disease.

FACT
Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching COVID-19. Your normal body temperature remains around 97.7°F to 98.6°F, regardless of the temperature of your bath or shower. Actually, taking a hot bath with extremely hot water can be harmful, as it can burn you.

  • MYTH
    The new coronavirus can be transmitted through mosquito bites.

FACT
To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes. The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.

  • MYTH
    Hand dryers are effective in killing the new coronavirus.

FACT
No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV.

  • MYTH
    Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will kill the new coronavirus.

FACT
NO. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. Spraying such substances can be harmful to clothes or mucous membranes (i.e. eyes, mouth). Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be useful to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.

  • MYTH
    Vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus.

FACT
No. Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus. The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are working to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, however a vaccine will likely not be ready for distribution for up to two (2) years. Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.

  • MYTH
    Regularly rinsing your nose with saline will help prevent infection with the new coronavirus.

FACT
No. There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from infection with the new coronavirus. There is some limited evidence that regularly rinsing nose with saline can help people recover more quickly from the common cold. However, regularly rinsing the nose has not been shown to prevent respiratory infections.

  • MYTH
    Eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus.

FACT
Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. While eating mass quantities might help with social distancing by encouraging people to keep their distance (Ha, ha, ha), there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus.

  • MYTH
    Antibiotics are effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus.

FACT
No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria. The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment. However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics because bacterial co-infection is possible.